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the science? you can see the scientific references and see where the studies were done at different research universities, the mayo clinic, harvard, and other places to see what the confirmation is all about. we can see that it improves the basics. , u r her rider, your engagement is stronger. every improvement translates to about 14 years on the average. after they are trained, the improvement would give them the memory level of an average person of about 56. we see faster and sharper thinking and acting. almost everything you do that involves making a decision about what you have seen or heard or acting in a complex behavior. this is certainly important from the point of view of for your sustaining independence. this is kind of interesting thing, right? people see things so much better that they have about half as many driving accidents, it makes a big difference in the safety of driving and also walking. we have seen improvements in health. the person spends about $300 less a year in health-care costs, that is because the brain training confers benefits and also to physical health from th
, and the results look promising. it's, like, with the rest of science, we'll apply the rigor, we'll follow where the data leads. we'll leave our politics at the door. >> reporter: i point out that none of this means that street ecstasy is safe. apart from being illegal you generally don't know what you're getting, it's often contamina contaminated. pure mdma can cause a higher body temperature, it can cause dehydration. there's also cases where people overcompensate and actually die from drinking too much water. but in a controlled setting which is what we're talking about here, the evidence does seem to suggest it can be safe. similar studies are under way in europe and canada, and midhoffer is halfway through a study offering this treatment to combat veterans, firefighters and police officers. dr. sanjay gupta cnn reporting. >> that is really amazing. and that's not the last of sanjay's research in to this as well. he's got a whole lot more coming up this weekend. if you want to tune in, some good stuff coming, saturday 4:30 p.m. eastern and if you miss it saturday, you got a second shot, sund
degree who we want to keep here in science, technology, engineering, and math. in many cases, if they're not allowed to stay, they will have to return to other countries and the jobs will follow them, costing our country jobs. choose between them and allowing people here from countries other than mexico, india, and china. some of whom are high skilled, some of whom are low skilled, divorce group across the board and looking back at many of our own forebears, certainly mine mitigating circumstance family came to this country in the late 19th century and early 20th century, 1890's, 1905. they didn't have master's degrees they zrntpampede's they didn't have college degrees. and that's the case for many of our forebears. and here today their great grandson sits as a member of congress. and had a program then existed whereby they could arrive nellliss island and be here, i wouldn't be here today my father has a ph.d. but that's a legacy of his hardworking immigrant grandparents who came to this country without a college degree. and in many cases without something that's the equivalent of e
in the world of make- believe could quickly become quite real. >> that is very cool. the science is in the special fabric. so you don't need a power source to make it work. so any soldier, even in the most remote location could quickly put it on and put it to work and disappear. >> wow. >>> a mixed day on wall street with money disappearing. the dow was up big. not the nasdaq. dow was up 83. s&p up 2. nasdaq down 23. let's go to new york, where alexis christoforous has tonight's cbs money watch update. >> reporter: stocks rallied as corporate news overshadowed concerns about the fiscal cliff. citigroup plans to cut 11,000 jobs as the bank's new ceo looks to save money. the cuts amount to about 4% of siti's -- sity's -- citi's work group. and it includes closing some branches. u.s. companies added fewer workers in november. bartly because super storm sandy shut down many businesses. including factories and retailers. they will get a better picture of the job market friday. shares of apple fell as much as 4% after a research firm raised its
happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. which isn't rocket science. [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen to them. and that their homeowners insurance protects them. [ thunder crashes ] it doesn't. stop pretending. only flood insurance covers floods. ♪ visit floodsmart.gov/pretend to learn your risk. >>> joining me for today's strategy session, paul begala along with cnn contributor erick erickson, editor and chief of the conservative political blog redstate.com. president obama went today to pennsylvania to a toy store, part of his p.r. strategy to try to sell his plans on the fiscal cliff. now, we know this works well for him in politics. he's won two elections obviously. but the question really i think today is whether this very same kind of thing is as effective when the president is pushing a policy issue. and i suppose, paul, i just ought to start with you in that. >> oh, i think it is, joe. first off, the president, yes, he served in the senate for like five minutes, but he's not a creature of wa
'll be joint staffers who are doing the real science and math on this on exactly what formations, what capabilities, and, therefore, how many civilians and military need to remain. i think that if you go to one end of the spectrum and go with just a few thousand soldiers, that's not enough to really secure yourself or do either too well. i think that's what my own research is doing. talking to a lot of smarter people in the week here in the capital region. if you go very large, you could run the risk of having the security forces from afghanistan become too reliant in those areas upon us because we're there taking care of them. i think they can be mitigated, i really do. there's got to be a really good, i think, science to exactly how you approach troops to task based upon the missions that we're given. that really is what needs to happen militarily. economically, we've got to stay informed in the -- invested in the region. you've got to have security forces. it's a sustainable force that works for afghans in the outyears. at the same time, diplomatically you've got to continue reconci
colleagues in recognizing chairman ralph hall for his tenure as chairman of the house science committee. during his service, he reached acrong the -- across the aisle and forged bipartisan coalitions to support important legislation and no program, in my view, has benefited more if his bipartisan commitment than the united states space program. representative hall has been an especially strong voice for our nation's human space flight program which has benefited not only tbs and florida but propoled our nation on the path of unprecedented scientific and technological advancement. we can all learn a lot from our colleagues. congressman hall leads by example. he's well known for calling a spade a spade. his word truly is his bond and you can always take that to the bank. advancing our nation's human space flight program has been a hallmark for chairman hall. as we look out at america's next general riggs of explorers, space is their destiny and he'll help ensure that they reach it. ralph, there's a lot of work to do and i'm truly honored by the opportunity to serve with you an get it done
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> our second story "outfront," panic in syria. at this moment tonight, there is fear the assad regime is getting desperate, so today, much of the country experienced a second day without internet access. it's a pretty incredible thing. i just want to show you this chart. internet activity was going up and up, then off. can you just imagine life in that situation? no one is sure why and as violence continues on the ground, there's a debate at home as to whether even at this what seems to be late hour, that the united states should get involved. senators have repeatedly called for the united states to arm the rebel forces, but the administration is not yet ready to do it. >> will providing arms to the opposition convince the people who support bashar al assad in many cases because they are afraid of their own existence, or will it simply lead to more fighting? that is the question that we are considering. >> it's a crucial question. "outfront" tonight, alex, author and former reporter for the
happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> you simply cannot have it all. there are not many things they can cut out of the tax code to boost the revenue. there are a few big things that do need to be considered. one of them is the mortgage interest deduction that 40 million of you have been claiming each year. don't throw anything at the tv set. i know you like it. it is expensive. it doesn't really get the government or the housing anything all that great. many countries do not have such a thing and they have higher homeownership rates than the u.s. does. canada is one example. 70% homeownership in the u.s. 65% in canada. you have the powerful lobbyists on your side, america, protecting this thing with everything they've got. they may very well succeed in swaying lawmakers to not touch the mortgage interest rate deduction. but you need to know where it came from, who benefits from it and what it costs. so, who better to explain that to us than christine romans? she joins us now. >> it's one of the most expensive. ali, of the tax goodies in th
not a science. and hopefully will be able to make a dent in that kind of -- that's what and those people will never admit they were wrong but it's -- i'm reading about for light reading i'm reading about -- [inaudible] [laughter] [applause] i think tonight -- [applause] i think tonight we brought a lot of life to this audience and the questions that economics and the challenge behind it. i'm grateful to you both. thank you for the discussion. thanks a lot for being here. [applause] >>> we'd like to hear from you. tweet us your feedback, twitter.com/booktv. >>> and now joining us on booktv is an old washington hand and that is ambassador stewart. he's an author, the future of jews is the name of the book. ambassador, why are you writing a book about the future of the jews? >> we have survived 3,000 years of calamityies and we survived and leave thrived and contributed to societies even those that didn't want us. now we have a whole new set of 21st century challenges, and the question is having survived those terrible times, can we now survive prosperity, success, and integration? and i lo
is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> this is the famous tax pledge we have been talking about created by grover norquist created back when reagan was president. it's not just lower tax rate that matters, it's the return that tax payers get in paying those taxes, what do they get in support, in services? washington has to do a lot to avoid the fiscal cliff
are controlled maybe by different things. >> another pathetic comment by an enemy of science. >>> up next, it sure looks like hillary clinton is running for president. we have the latest signs next. >>> and you're watching "hardball," the place for politics. [ man ] ring ring... progresso this reduced sodium soup says it may help lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just have to eat it as part of your heart healthy diet. step 1. eat the soup. all those veggies and beans, that's what may help lower your cholesterol and -- well that's easy [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. and i want that's what may help lower your cholesterol and -- well that's easy to roll over my old 401(k) into a fidelity ira. man: okay, no problem. it's easy to get started; i can help you with the paperwork. um...this green line just appeared on my floor. yeah, that's fidelity helping you reach your financial goals. could you hold on a second? it's your money. roll over your old 401(k) into a fidelity ira and take control of your personal economy. this is going to be helpful. call or come in
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. if we want to improve our schools... ... what should we invest in? maybe new buildings? what about updated equipment? they can help, but recent research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. [ female announcer ] if you care for someone with mild to moderate alzheimer's, you'll also care about our new offer. you get access to nurses who can help with your questions. and your loved one can get exelon patch free for 30 days. if the doctor feels it's right for them. it cannot change how the disease progresses. hospitalization and rarely death have been reported in patients who wore more than one patch at a time. the most common side effects of exelon patch are nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. the likelihood and severity of these side effects may increase as the dose increases. patients may experience loss
that the science is unequivocal on this. that repeated hits to the head. not just concussions by the way but routine hits to the head that football players take often lead far more than in the general lop legs lead to depression, the early on set of ghen sharks alzheimer's and even lou gehrig's disease there no question about that who would deny that it's the roughest game in the world maybe with the exception of rugby and if you are going to play it it, you are taking a bodily risk. everyone knows that. >> absolutely. >> you are richly rewarded if you succeed. and then there are guys like my friend frank gifford who played many many years, got a bunch of concussions but, you know, he is now an elderly man but is he still in good shape. so it's not a cause and effect, this is absolutely going to happen. but the culture of pro-football now is so intense and these guys take a lot of substance, whether they admit it or not, painkillers, just to build your body up and all of that. that i'm just wondering whether this is a really now off the chart high risk group for the madness exon inept. >
, this is not rocket science. that piece is very easy to -- >> but once you do that, why don't you admit you're not -- you're going to let the top rates go back to 39.6%. >> you can do that but this is the kicker. the republicans want to see that they're actually going to get something in the bargain that's going to be real and genuine, not the promise for cuts in entitlement spending four or five kongss from now but in the next -- >> let's talk turkey. everybody on the o shows do it their way. i want to do it a certain way. >> of course. >> of course. sarcasm won't stop you, might not have you back here again. i'm just kidding. you're invaluable. let's go with this thing. during the cuban missile crisis kennedy and khrushchev were communicating through different ways. kennedy was trying to communicate i will do it this way, this won't work for you stick, this will work for you. so they found ways to communicate. is there a communication going on head to head between the president and the speaker right now? >> as of -- >> are they thinking back and forth? >> as of last wednesday they spoke o
competing to win the army's next multi-million dollar contract. he showed us the science behind every shape, size, and shade of these pixels. >> you now have your camouflage. we're trying to trick the brain into seeing things that aren't actually there. >> reporter: digital patterns recreate shapes already found in nature, and 3-d layering creates depth and shad dose where none exist. that's today's design. but developers already have one eye on tomorrow. >> what's coming up down the road and very quickly is the harry potter cloak. >> what is that? >> reporter: with that fictional cloak, harry isn't just camouflaged, he's invisible. >> my body's gone! >> how invisible are we talking here? if i walked into a room with a soldier wearing one of these cloaks -- >> you wouldn't see him at all. he would be completely invisible to you. >> reporter: this isn't make believe. the military has seen the so-called quantum stealth technology. it works by bending the light around an object, even concealing most of a person's shadow. imagine what that could do for a sniper, hiding in a field, or the americ
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visas now will go to foreign nationals with advanced degrees in science, technology, engineering and math, that's the s.t.e.m. acronym, a lot say it's a piece meal approach and comprehensive is a way to go. what do you think about that? >> that is the question. we started out with a comprehensive approach. that didn't work the first time. a piece meal approach is what is being led right now by republicans. mario diaz balart and congressman labrador in the house, and what this does, for example, is allows us to increase the number of scientists, mathematicians, phds, who come into the country to stay here and work in the u.s. who have studied here instead of kicking them out, have them come in and work for us. we don't have enough people helping us with innovation, and what's happening is some companies are building r & d centers in canada because they can't find the people here. >> i want to go to something that a member of congress said. representative louis gutierrez says if you support this bill said you're saying one group of immigrants is better than another and one type of
, the bringing in a science and technology. you are a world bank guy. you went to harvard and dell was science and technology. here we are was tremendous knowledge in these fields. we talk about helping democracies. how do you see that from not only indicating these villages but scholarships and others, whether it is the french, the canadians, the brits, so that there are always for educational, the empowerment of women come are raising their status, inclusion. the american bar society and all those groups. what do you think about that? is it such that unless you have big muscular defense, big muscular foreign aid? i don't think america will ever be a wimp in anything, but i have an additional school of thought. what do you think? what could help that in america? >> thank you. generally, to speak a very frankly and what you have requested, the support of law enforcement in colombia has been helpful. that is a first step. as you said coming in several points to develop. increasing security capabilities and increasing the state's capability to promote human rights. in a case like ours, we have h
. >> gretchen: one student may want to study the next time a science professor made sure the whole world could see the students' wrong answer. you are got to come it your screen to check this out. the exam asks which park could be a volcano and the student circled gary busey! as in the actor! >> steve: he's a volcano. >> gretchen: i'm not sure he's a volume kay nome the student admitted to circling answers without looking. >> brian: everyone has their private strategyies. >> steve: i wonder if he will ever graduate. the reason i mention that in a hugely popular commencement speech he gave in 2009 at the university of tennessee, iconic music star dolly parton told graduates how her dream of making it big in the music industry took her from a install town in tennessee to the top of the entertainment business. >> the night i graduated from high school back in 1964, we were all asked to stand up and talk about what we were going to do with the rest of our lives and everybody had a different story and when it came my time, i stood right up there and said, i'm going to nashville and i'm going to be
a speech in which he says he wants to use the tax hike to invest in training, education, science and research. when you're in a deep, deep hole, you're borrowing almost 40 cents of every dollar you spend, shouldn't you constrain yourself and not start new programs? or if you start a new needed program, shouldn't you reduce some less valuable program to pay for it instead of just taxing to create more programs? so not once in the speech did he discuss entitlements. it's the largest item in our government, entitlements. not once did the president of the united states discuss with the american people the problem of social security, medicare, medicaid are on an unsustainable path and are at great risk. shouldn't the president honestly talk to the american people about that? he didn't discuss our $16 trillion debt and how the debt commission that he appointed indicates that we're on an unsustainable path heading to a fiscal crisis. he did not discuss that. or the economic catastrophe that could occur if we don't get off this unsustainable path. the president should lead on these thing
've reviewed it and the results look promising. it's like the rest of science. we'll follow where the data leads. we'll leave our politics at the door. >> point out that none of this means street ecstasy is safe. apart from being illegal, you don't know what you're getting. it's often contaminated. it can cause a higher body temperature, dehydration and also cases where people overwhen sate and actually die from drinking too much water. but in a controlled setting, which is what we're talking about here, the evidence does seem to suggest that it can be safe. similar studies are underway in europe and canada. and he's halfway through a study offering this treatment to combat veterans, firefighters and police officers. dr. sanjay gupta, cnn reporting. >> make sure you tune into dr. sanjay gupta this weekend saturday afternoon at 4:30 eastern and sunday morning at 7:30 eastern. >>> dozens of fast food workers protest and walk off the job. up next, find out what workers from mcdonald's, kfc and burger king are demanding. tonight our guest, thomas sargent. nobel laureate in economics, and one o
proposition. last week i saw one of their science programs. they introduced something called crowd sourcing. it is individuals with their own computers take down complex intellectual problems and solve them and then up load the answers to help scientists. last week they saw these unbelievably complicated issues about protein. i like to bring crowd sourcing into this policy. maybe we can set them up in every state assistance could learn what is going on and there's a budget and then come up to the great hill there and see if we could take on a crowd sourcing of the federal budget. at least we're getting an education if we're paying attention. you can not be simple enough. we need the basics. what is the base as and broaden the base? them we would have an independent check on the work of the ceo and all the bookings. guest: thank you. that is a very interesting idea. the go to the federal budget, they have tax cuts or you can plug in which taxes the want to get rid of and how it affects the rate and individuals and their tax burdens. they also have one on the spending side. it is a terrific t
. jekyll technology parts. >> science, technology, engineering and math are fundamental to the growth of the economy and the united states obviously has work to do, my oldest daughter is doing her doctorate in math. there's a substantial contribution to national security in any case. with respect to the dr. jekyll and mr. hyde bit, economic growth is fundamental and innovation is the key engine for that and freedom is the foundation for that. i think we will see this play out in interesting ways globally including within china, and as we work to have a very open system economically and take advantage of technology, we also need to look at what needs to be done to deal with the threats of not just cyber but biotech and so on and look at doing that in partnership, and the partners we look at, and a substantial conversation about the rules of the road in cyberspace, we do that with many others, a fundamental issue. >> got a little bit from global security, the issue of the islands is primarily an issue of energy, and we are seeing it all over the world today, we don't have good mechanism
, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> you're in "the situation room." a historic vote prompts massive celebrations on one side and harsh condeminations on the other. cnn has it covered like no one else can. >>> mitt romney has lunch at the white house with president obama. new details of what they talked about. >>> plus, this -- vice president joe biden goes shopping at costco. and he needed to phone for help. i'm wolf blitzer, you're in "the situation room." >>> a historic vote at the united nations voting to upgrade the palestinian authority. goes from nonmember observer entity to nonmember observer state. an implicit recognition of p palestinian statehood. 41 countries abstaining. the u.s. and israel among those voting no. >> today's unfortunate and counterproductive resolution places further obstacles in the path to peace. that is why the united states voted against it. the backers of today's resolution say they seek a functioning, independent, palestinian state at peace with israel. so do we. but we have long been clear that the only way to
have the greatest colleges in the world and who develop expertise in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, in areas that might have an immediate impact on some of the most important growth industries as we look to the future. when we say to them, if you get your degree here, you got to go to your home country for several years and then apply to come back to this country in order to work here, but canada will allow you right away. other countries will allow you right away. or go back to your own country and compete with the united states economy and your emerging economic fwrothe in your home country. i saw this very, very closely at hand when i saw one of our major technology companies actually build a plant just over the border in canada, utilizing a core of those people who had graduated from american colleges, had come from foreign countries and were immediately accepted into canada and then canada was able to build a work force of about 1,000 people around a core of probably no more than 100 people that would have been required to go back to their own countries from the u
sister in the seventh grade had a friend of mine as her science teacher, my mom took my yearbook down, took a picture of his picture, xeroxed it, put it in a frame from senior year and gave it to him in this beautiful frame. it was psonalized and he loved it. but if you have multiple teachers, you don't have to give all those teachers a gift. >> yeah. makes sense. >> if you have an assistant, what factors do you think about when you're talking about a tip? >> well, that really depends on your position in the company and how long that assistant has been with you. now, if it were up to me and i wanted to make sure those calls were screened properly, i would bump that up. >> doormen, do you give to all of the doormen? sometimes you live in a big building there's 10 or 15. >> most of us live in doormen-staffed building. if you don't want to necessarily play favorites, but at the same time, you know, if someone's been helpful or more helpful than others, you might want to give them a gift. also, these buildings have pools. so you could pool together, you know, your money. it's anonymous, t
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)

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